Weber Genesis Features & Comparison Chart

 Picture above is the EP-330

Key Features


 

Stainless Steel Cooking Grates
7mm diameter stainless steel cooking grates serve double duty-they retain heat evenly and create beautiful sear marks.
 

Flavorizer Bars
The Flavorizer bars on our gas grills are angled to exactly the right pitch to direct juices down and away from the burners and create flavorful smoke without flare-ups.

 

Sear Station Burner
Maximize the heat without minimizing grilling space. This high-powered, 10,000 BTU-per-hour burner is designed to step up the heat on demand for searing.

 

Side Burner
12,000 BTU-per-hour input flush mounted side burner lets you multi-task while grilling
 

3 Burners, Individual Electronic Ignition
Intuitive. Convenient. Efficient to the max. Now you can quickly and reliably ignite only the burners you need at any given time.

   

 

Genesis Comparison Chart


 

Cooking System S-310 S-330 EP-310 EP-330
Stainless Steel Burners 3 3 3 3
Porcelain enameled cast iron cooking grates        
7mm diameter stainless steel rod cooking grates * * * *
Porcelain enameled Flavorizer bars        
Stainless steel Flavorizer bars * * * *
Main burners BTU per hour input 38,000 38,000 38,000 38,000
Side burner BTU per hour input   12,000   12,000
Sear Station burner BTU per hour input   10,000   10,000
Individual electronic ingnition system * * * *
Cooking Area        
Primary cooking area (square inches) 507 507 507 507
Warming rack area (square inches) 130 130 130 130
Total cooking area (square inches) 637 637 637 637
Features        
Tool Hooks 6 6 6 6
Owner's Guide and Recipes * * * *
Price $869 $949 $749 $849

 

Charcoal Grill Buyers Guide

What To Look For In A Charcoal Grill

Okay, you’ve got the fever. But do you have the right grill? Remember, your food’s only going to be as good as your grill, so make sure a one-time bargain doesn’t turn into a long-term disappointment. Invest in a good grill and you can focus on dinner, not your toolbox.

The Elements of a Charcoal Grill

The beauty of a charcoal grill is its simplicity. At the core of a good charcoal grill is a charcoal grate to place the fuel on. Above that is a cooking grate. A lid with air vents tops it off. Simple and uncomplicated.

Solid Construction

A good, well-built grill will feel solid and sturdy; a poorly made grill will wiggle. If a grill isn’t solid on the sales floor, chances are it will fall apart rather quickly on the patio or deck. Choose a grill made of high grade U.S. steel. Also opt for a baked-on, porcelain-enamel finish. The legs should be sturdy, wheels should roll easily, and the grill should display a good fit and finish.

Cooking grates are generally made from heavy-duty plated steel or chrome-plated aluminum. A thicker, heavier-gauge cook- ing grate will last longer and distribute and retain heat better. Grates coated with porcelain enamel are a common step-up feature. The best grates are made of cast iron, stainless steel, or porcelain-coated aluminum or cast iron.

Assembly

When you buy a barbecue you want to grill, not drill, so fast, easy assembly is a priority. Some grills require hours (and an engineering degree) to assemble. Better brands reduce or eliminate the amount of assembly required by the consumer.

Service & Maintenance

Top-notch after-market service supports any quality made grill, including thorough, easy-to-read information about the product, and a toll-free service line. A good grill is easy to clean and to maintain, and long-life is assured by easy access to replacement parts and service through a well-established servicing dealer network.

Safety

A good grill controls heat easily, has handles that stay cool to the touch, and has added safety features.

Long Warranty

It makes sense: the best manufacturers can afford to stand behind their products. Don’t settle for less than a 10 year warranty.

Gas Grill Buyers Guide

What To Look For In A Gas Grill

Besides price, what separates an ordinary gas grill from a great gas grill? Here are a few points savvy grill shoppers should know.

The Elements of a Gas Grill

The basic underpinnings of a gas grill are really quite simple: First come burners to create heat. Above them you’ll find some type of system to disperse the heat from the burners (Flavorizer bars, ceramic briquettes, lava rock, etc.). Above those lie the cooking grates. Let’s look under the hood to get a better sense of what you should be looking for.

The Cooking System

Better grills generally have two or more separate burners (not just control knobs) which allow greater control of heat. Most lower-priced grills have only one burner shaped like an H or a bar, some with one control, some with two controls. Grills with one burner don’t allow you to control heat as well as grills with multiple burners and may result in hot and cold spots on the cooking surface.

When cooking on a gas grill, juices from the food drip down and accumulate near the heat source until they reach a flash point and burn off. The best systems quickly flash the drippings, eliminating flare-ups and creating flavorful smoke. Most manufacturers rely on lava rock or ceramic briquettes to distribute the heat from the burners to the cooking surface. Drip- pings from the food tend to pool in these systems causing undue flare-ups. The best grills use a steel bar system (pioneered by Weber) that funnels the grease away from the burner flames, greatly reducing flare-ups.

BTUs (British Thermal Units)

BTUs are not a measure of cooking power. They indicate the volume of gas a grill can burn. Tightly engineered grills use fewer BTUs and cook food more efficiently. Sometimes less is more. Too many BTUs can cause damage to burners and reduce the life of the grill. In general, large grills with large cooking surfaces require higher BTUs.

Solid Construction

A good, well-built grill will feel solid and sturdy; a poorly made grill will wiggle. If a grill isn’t solid on the sales floor, chances are it will fall apart rather quickly on the patio or deck. Choose a grill made of high grade U.S. steel. Also opt for a baked-on, porcelain-enamel finish. The cart should be sturdy, wheels should roll easily, and the grill should display a good fit and finish.

Cooking grates are generally made from heavy-duty plated steel or chrome-plated aluminum. A thicker, heavier-gauge cook- ing grate will last longer and distribute and retain heat better. Grates coated with porcelain enamel are a common step-up feature. The best grates are made of cast iron, stainless steel, or porcelain-coated aluminum or cast iron.

Assembly

When you buy a barbecue, you want to grill, not drill, so fast and easy assembly is a priority. Some grills require hours (and an engineering degree) to assemble. Better brands reduce or eliminate the amount of assembly required by the consumer.

Service & Maintenance

Top-notch after-market service supports any quality made grill, including thorough, easy-to-read information about the product, and a toll-free service line. A good grill is easy to clean and to maintain, and long-life is assured by easy access to replacement parts and service through a well-established servicing dealer network.

Safety

A good grill lights effortlessly, controls heat easily, has handles that stay cool to the touch, and has added safety features.

Long Warranty

It makes sense: the best manufacturers can afford to stand behind their products. Don’t settle for less than a 10- year warranty.

Added Conveniences

Optional side burners are great for cooking sauces and other dishes. Flip-up side tables give you extra space for food preparation.

Charcoal or Gas?

It's a Lifestyle Choice

This is really your first decision. Are you convinced there’s nothing like the taste and smell of food grilled over hot coals? Do you take a certain pride in your ability to get the fire started and keep it properly tended while you cook? Do you need that hands-on, primal experience? Or do you want a perfect fire at the push of a button? Do you appreciate the precision temperature adjustments gas grills can provide? Would you rather avoid the whole charcoal set-up and the post-cookout ashes?

Whether you’re in the charcoal or gas grill camp, you’re in luck. Taste tests indicate there’s no significant flavor difference either way. The choice is strictly personal. Consider how you plan to use your grill. Will you grill every night or just on special occasions? Will that change over time? Is cost an issue? While gas grills are initially more expensive, they generally cost less to operate in the long run. Both are great choices. Pick the one that’s right for you!

Chile Grill Pepper Preparation

Using the Chile Grill is the easy way to make stuffed jalapenos. This grill is built using heavy gauge stainless steel and is completely dishwasher safe.

Before you use the Chile Grill it probably wouldn’t hurt to give it a good washing. When it’s clean you may want to squirt it with some cooking oil, doesn’t need much, just enough to keep the cheese or whatever from sticking.

Basic Jalapeno Pepper Preparation

When selecting your jalapenos at the store go for the big ones that are straight and tapered. It makes fixing them easier, and there’s more to eat later! Here’s where you put on the rubber gloves if your have real sensitive skin. Cut the tops off the jalapenos then, using the Chile Twister or the Chile Grill Jalapeno Corer, carefully core each pepper, remove the seeds and set them in the Chile Grill. If you don’t want any surprises later make sure you get all the seeds!

Stuff Em!

Now comes the fun part, actually this part starts at the store, stuff something in `em! As you’re wandering down the aisle in the store, let your imagination go wild with ideas of what to put in your little creations. Every thing from the plain cheese, refried beans, cream cheese, sausage, to the more bold; shrimp, crab, smoked oysters or pickled baby corns. Somebody might even like peanut butter! Anyway, put a little salt in the peppers, stuff them with something and put a toothpick through them and set them back in the Chile Grill. The toothpick is important because even the biggest jalapeno will fall through when it gets done enough. Some people top them off with a third of a slice of bacon and the toothpick keeps it on. One thing about using the bacon is, when it’s done, the peppers are done.

Cooking

Put the Chile Grill with your stuffed peppers on your grill at about 350 degrees using the indirect heat method. If you cook them at a higher temperature it will boil out any stuffing's you use that have a high water content. Cook your peppers for about an hour if you want the peppers to lose all their heat. If you like your peppers to have a little kick, leave them on for about 30 to 45 minutes. Cooking with indirect heat keeps the bottom of the peppers from burning before the tops are done.

Enjoy!